The Saint of love, forgiveness & discernment: Saint Jacob Tsalikis of Evia Island, Greece (+1991)

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SAINTS OF MY HEART

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The Saint of love, forgiveness & discernment:

Saint Jacob Tsalikis of Evia Island, Greece (+1991)

22 November

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/98806.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

Our age and today’s culture has, unfortunately moved away from the vision and pursuit of sanctity. The Orthodox faith is based on the presence of the saints. Without these, our Church is on the path towards secularization. Naturally, as we know from Scripture, God alone is holy, and sanctity derives from our relationship with Him, and therefore sanctity is theocentric rather than anthropocentric. Our sanctity depends on the glory and the grace of God and our union with Him, not on our virtues. Sanctification assumes the free will of the person being sanctified. As Saint Maximos the Confessor says, all that we bring is our intentions. Without those, God doesn’t act. And Saint John the Damascan repeats that we render honour to the saints ‘for having become freely unified with God and having Him dwell in them and by this participation having become by grace what He is by nature’. The saints didn’t seek to be glorified, but to glorify God, because sanctity means participation in and communion with the sanctity of God.

The source of sanctity in the Orthodox Church is the Divine Eucharist. By partaking of the Holy One, Jesus Christ, we become holy. The ‘holy things’, the Body and Blood of Christ, are given as communion ‘to the holy’, the members of the Church. Sanctity follows on from Holy Communion. The ascetic struggles of the saints are not an aim but a means which leads to the aim, which is Eucharistic communion, the most perfect and complete union with the Holy One. In the Lord’s prayer, the ‘Our Father’, we see that sanctification is associated with the Kingdom of God. We ask that His Kingdom come into the world so that everyone can praise Him and can partake of His sanctity and His glory, which is what we call ‘deification’.

The Kingdom of God and deification are an eternal extension of the Divine Liturgy within space and time, as Saint Maximos the Confessor writes. By taking part in the Continue reading “The Saint of love, forgiveness & discernment: Saint Jacob Tsalikis of Evia Island, Greece (+1991)”

On two types of love – Saint Maria Skobtsova of Paris (+1945)

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FRANCE OF MY HEART

On two types of love

Saint Maria Skobtsova of Paris (+1945)

March 31

In this world there are two kinds of love: one that takes and one that gives. This is common to all types of love — not only love for man. One can love a friend, one’s family, children, scholarship, art, the motherland, one’s own ideas, oneself — and even God — from either of these two points of view. Even those forms of love which by common consent are the highest can exhibit this dual character.

Take, for example, maternal love. A mother can often forget herself, sacrifice herself for her children. Yet this does not as yet warrant recognition as Christian love for her children. One needs to ask the question: what is it that she loves in them? She may love her own reflection, her second youth, an Continue reading “On two types of love – Saint Maria Skobtsova of Paris (+1945)”

He who does not love his brother dwells in death – Saint Patrick of Ireland (+461)

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IRELAND OF MY HEART

He who does not love his brother dwells in death

Saint Patrick of Ireland (+461)

Saint Patrick of Ireland:

“It would take too long to discuss or argue every single case, or to sift through the whole of the Law for precise witness against such greed. Sufficient to say, greed is a deadly deed. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods. You shall not murder. A homicide may not stand beside Christ. Even “He who hates his brother is to be labeled murderer.” Or, “He who does not love his brother dwells in death.” therefore how much more guilty is he, who has stained his own hands in the blood of the sons of God, those very children whom only just now he has won for himself in this distant land by means of our feeble encouragement”.

—Letter to the Soldiers of Coroticus (c.450?)

Are you Christian? Forget about doing Yoga! – The Church would like people to replace Yoga with Prayer

http://easternorthodoxchurch.blogspot.com

EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCH

Are you Christian? Forget about doing Yoga!

The Church would like people to replace Yoga with Prayer

The Holy Synod of the Greek Orthodox Church reacted to the UN’s decision to designate June 21 as International Day of Yoga in 2014. The Holy Synod’s statement says that the practice of yoga has “no place in the lives of Christians” since it is a fundamental aspect of Hinduism and as such is not considered a “form of exercise” but of worship!

Though praised for its calming effect and wellness, Christians are urged to seek the same comfort in God – not hindu practises. After all, the postures of yoga were created as adulation to 330 million Hindu gods. The postures are viewed in the Hindu faith as offerings to gods that in Christianity are considered to be idols.

Furthermore, a third of yoga is concerned with emptying the mind – a contradiction to what Christianity teaches. In the Christian faith, there is free choice and transformation through renewal. Furthermore, astral travel that yoga guides people into is a practise that the church continues to frown upon.

“For this reason, yoga is totally incompatible with our Christian Orthodox faith and it has no place in the life of Christians,” the statement said, even though it added that the the Church respects religious freedom.

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/80060.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

Orthodox Christianity: Norway

http://www.pravoslavie.ru/search/?text=norway

Orthodox Christianity: Norway

The difference between Christianity and communism – Elder Joel Yannakopoulos of Kalamata, Greece (+1966)

http://faithbookorthodoxy.wordpress.com

FAITHBOOK – ORTHODOXY

The difference between Christianity and communism

Elder Joel Yannakopoulos of Kalamata, Greece (+1966)

A communist once told Fr. Joel, “Father, communism is the same as Christianity! In terms of society, there’s no difference between them. Both communism and Christianity want equality, brotherhood, and social justice.”

“However, there is one small difference,” said Fr. Joel.

“What?”

“Christianity tells its followers: ‘Why do you have, and another does not? Go and give to him!’ But communism tells its followers: ‘Why does another have, and you do not? Go and take from him!’ Do you see the difference?”

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/115308.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

2018: Saint Arsenios of Paros Island of Greece resurrects a baby girl in Belgium

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SAINTS OF MY HEART

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Saint Arsenios of Paros Island, Greece (+1877)

January 31

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2018: Saint Arsenios of Paros Island of Greece,

resurrects a baby girl in Belgium

Source:

http://full-of-grace-and-truth.blogspot.com

http://full-of-grace-and-truth.blogspot.com/2018/01/st-arsenios-of-paros-resurrects-baby.html

FULL OF GRACE AND TRUTH

A few minutes ago, Nun Arsenia Tsantouli (the Abbess of the Monastery where St. Arsenios of Paros Island in Greece lived in asceticism), and the Nuns offered the following astonishing miracle:

In Belgium lived for many years the sister of Abbess Arsenia, where she had a family, and her granddaughter was made worthy 5 months ago to become a mother.

The baby girl was baptized this year, 2018, on the feast of Theophany and received the name Arsenia in honor of the Venerable Arsenios.

However, the baby got sick suddenly and they took her to the hospital with dyspnea.

After two days, January 8th 2018, the baby unfortunately left this life, leaving her parents inconsolable.

That very day, a Greek doctor, who was in that very hospital, was making his rounds, and received as a visitor an old man with a cane, whom he told that the baby was dead. The old man told him to go and perform chest compressions and breaths, and even though 24 hours had passed since her death was confirmed by science, that the child would live.

The doctor noted in a letter that he did what the old man said, and the baby Arsenia, glory to God, returned to life!

As the mother returned to the hospital in order to prepare for the funeral, she found her baby girl alive in her bed.

The Elder who spoke to the doctor was St. Arsenios himself, as his appears in his icon.

“God is wondrous among His Saints!”

Fr. Dionysios Tampakis
January 22nd 2018
The Holy Monastery of Christ of Forest – St. Arsenios, Paros Island, Greece