Is there biblical evidence in support of Icons?

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ORTHODOXY IS LOVE

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Is there biblical evidence in support of Icons?

In the Holy Bible, Cherubim are Angels. Icons (images) of Angels.

Exodus 26:31 > “Make a curtain of blue, purple and scarlet yarn and finely twisted linen, with cherubim woven into it by a skilled worker.

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Exodus 25:17-21 > 17 “Make an atonement cover of pure gold—two and a half cubits long and a cubit and a half wide. 18 And make two cherubim out of hammered gold at the ends of the cover. 19 Make one cherub on one end and the second cherub on the other; make the cherubim of one piece with the cover, at the two ends. 20 The cherubim are to have their wings spread upward, overshadowing the cover with them. The cherubim are to face each other, looking toward the cover. 21 Place the cover on top of the ark and put in the ark the tablets of the covenant law that I will give you.

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Hebrews 9:5 > Above the ark were the cherubim of the Glory, overshadowing the atonement cover. But we cannot discuss these things in detail now.

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Acts 5:15 >As a result, people brought the sick into the streets and laid them on beds and mats so that at least Peter’s shadow might fall on some of them as he passed by.

Peter’s shadow is an icon (image) of Apostle Peter.

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Abel Gkiouzelis

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Ko Ihu te Atua? I a Ihu ake titau ki te waiho i te Atua? ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Maori (New Zealand)

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HEART QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

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Ko Ihu te Atua? I a Ihu ake titau ki te waiho i te Atua?

Kua kore i tuhituhia i roto i a Ihu i te Biblia rite mea te kupu pau, “Ko ahau te Atua.” E kore e tikanga, Heoi, e kore i te kauwhau i ia e he ia te Atua. Tikina hoki tauira kupu e Ihu ‘i roto i John 10:30, “Ahau me te Matua, kotahi.” Me anake tatou ki te titiro i te Hurai ‘hohenga ki tona parau ki te mohio i te kī e ia ki te Atua hei. Tamata ratou ki te kohatu a ia mo te take tenei rawa. “…koe, he tangata mere, titau ki te waiho i te Atua” (John 10:33). I matau ki te Hurai rite te mea i a Ihu e kereme-atua. Ite e kore e Ihu whakakahore tana kerēme ki te waiho i te Atua. A, no ka korerotia e Ihu, “Ahau me te Matua, kotahi” (John 10:30), I mea ia e ia, me te Matua, ko o tetahi āhua me te ngako. John 8:58 Ko tetahi tauira. a Ihu whakaaturia, “Korerotia e ahau ki a koutou i te pono, i mua i whanau a Aperahama i, Ko ahau!” Ko te whakautu o nga Hurai te hunga i rongo i tēnei tauākī, ko ki te tango ake kohatu ki te whakamatea ia mo te kohukohu, ka pera me ta te Ture a Mose ki a ratou ki te mahi (Leviticus 24:15).

Reiterates John i te ariā o te atua a Ihu’: “ko te Atua ano te Kupu” me te “ka te Kupu kikokiko” (John 1:1, 14). Āta tohu teie mau irava e, o Iesu te Atua i roto i te kikokiko. Mahi 20:28 parau mai ia tatou, “Kia hepara o te hahi o te Atua, i hokona e ia ki ona ake toto.” Ko wai ka hokona e te hahi-te hahi a te Atua,-ki ona ake toto? A Ihu Karaiti. Mahi 20:28 ta e hokona te Atua tona hahi ki te tona ake toto. Na reira, a Ihu, ko te Atua!

Thomas korerotia te akonga mo Ihu, “Toku Ariki, e toku Atua,” (John 20:28). E kore e whakatika ia Ihu. E akiaki ana Titus 2:13 ia tatou ki te tatari mo te tae mai o to tatou Atua, me te Faaora, a Ihu Karaiti (vakai foki, 2 Pita 1:1). I roto i Hiperu s 1:8, e ai ta te Matua o Ihu, “Ko e pā ana ki te Tama a te kupu ia, ‘Tou torona, e te Atua, ka mau tonu a ake ake, me te tika, ka hei te hepeta o tou kingitanga.’” Kōrero i te Matua ki a Ihu rite “e te Atua” whakaatu i te mea pono a Ihu te Atua.

I roto i te Apokalupo, whakaakona tetahi anahera i te apotetoro ko Ioane ki te koropiko ki te Atua anake (Apokalupo 19:10). E rave rahi mau taime i roto i te karaipiture a Ihu whiwhi koropiko (Matthew 2:11, 14:33, 28:9, 17; Luke 24:52; John 9:38). Kore ia riria iwi mō te koropiko ki a ia. Ki te kore i a Ihu e te Atua, kua korerotia e ia ki te iwi ki te kore e koropiko ki a ia, kia rite ki nga mahi a te anahera i roto i te Apokalupo. He maha atu irava, me irava o te karaipiture e tohe mo te atua a Ihu ‘.

Ko te take i tino nui e kua a Ihu ki te waiho i te Atua, ko e ki te he e kore ia te Atua, tana mate e kore i nava’i ki te utu i te utu mo te hara o te ao (1 John 2:2) kua. He oranga i hanga, i pai kia a Ihu, ki te kahore i ia te Atua, e kore e taea te utu i te utu e hiahiatia ana mo te hara faito ore ki te Atua mure ore. Te Atua anake i taea e utu i tētahi taua whiu e taea. Anake i taea e tangohia e te Atua i runga i te hara o te ao (2 Kolinitoó 5:21), mate, a faahou, whakamatautau ana i runga i te wikitoria hara, me te mate.

What is the origin of the different races?

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EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCH

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What is the origin of the different races?

The Bible does not explicitly give us the origin of the different “races” or skin colors in humanity. In actuality, there is only one race—the human race. Within the human race is diversity in skin color and other physical characteristics. Some speculate that when God confused the languages at the tower of Babel (Genesis 11:1-9), He also created racial diversity. It is possible that God made genetic changes to humanity to better enable people to survive in different ecologies, such as the darker skin of Africans being better equipped genetically to survive the excessive heat in Africa. According to this view, God confused the languages, causing humanity to segregate linguistically, and then created genetic racial differences based on where each racial group would eventually settle. While possible, there is no explicit biblical basis for this view. The races/skin colors of humanity are nowhere mentioned in connection with the tower of Babel.

At the Tower of Babel, when the different languages came into existence, groups that spoke one language moved away with others of the same language. In doing so, the gene pool for a specific group shrank dramatically as the group no longer had the entire human population to mix with. Closer inbreeding took place, and in time certain features were emphasized in these different groups (all of which were present as a possibility in the genetic code). As further inbreeding occurred through the generations, the gene pool grew smaller and smaller, to the point that people of one language family all had the same or similar features.

Another explanation is that Adam and Eve possessed the genes to produce black, brown, and white offspring (and everything else in between). This would be similar to how a mixed-race couple sometimes has children that vary in color. Since God obviously desired humanity to be diverse in appearance, it makes sense that God would have given Adam and Eve the ability to produce children of different skin tones. Later, the only survivors of the flood were Noah and his wife, Noah’s three sons and their wives—eight people in all (Genesis 7:13). Perhaps Noah’s daughters-in-law were of different races. It is also possible that Noah’s wife was of a different race than Noah. Maybe all eight of them were of mixed race, which would mean they possessed the genetics to produce children of different races. Whatever the explanation, the most important aspect of this question is that we are all the same race, all created by the same God, all created for the same purpose—to glorify Him.

Source: Elmer L. Towns, Bible Answers for Almost All Your Questions, THOMAS NELSON / 2003 / PAPERBACK

Why did God use Adam’s rib to create Eve?

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ORTHODOXY IS LOVE

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Why did God use Adam’s rib to create Eve?

The story of “Adam’s rib” is found in Genesis. Genesis 2:18–24 tells the well-known account of how God created the first woman, Eve, by removing a “rib” from Adam’s body and fashioning it into the woman. The creation account clearly indicates that God used Adam’s rib to create Eve instead of making her from the dust of the ground as He had done for Adam. The question also arises as to why God created woman out of Adam’s rib. God apparently had formed male and female animals separately, but the female human was originally part of man—Adam said, “She shall be called ‘woman,’ for she was taken out of man” (Genesis 2:23).

God used Adam’s rib to form Eve to show that they were actually the same created being, two halves of a whole. The female was not created as a separate being, second to the male. She was formed as part of the initial man, in order to be a “helper suitable” for the male (Genesis 2:18). While Adam was in a divinely induced sleep, God “took one of the man’s ribs and . . . made a woman” (Genesis 2:21–22). Eve was brought into being to strengthen and powerfully help Adam; she was made from the same “stuff,” and she was every bit as perfect a creation as man and every bit as patterned after God’s image and likeness (Genesis 1:27).

The woman made of Adam’s rib was designed to be a “suitable helper” for Adam (Genesis 2:20). The Hebrew phrase is translated “help meet” in the KJV and “companion who corresponded” in the NET. It is not synonymous with assistant, servant, minion, or subordinate. The Hebrew phrase, ’ezer kenegdow, in all other instances in the Bible refers to powerful and extensive aid and support. In most cases, the phrase was used to depict dominant military forces or armed men. Other passages, including Deuteronomy 33:7, 29, and Exodus 18:4, use the same phrase to discuss the potent interventions and deliverances of God Himself. Woman, therefore, was created as a complement to man, as an integral part of man, and as a powerful and influential companion for man.

Furthermore, the Hebrew word translated “suitable,” kenegdow, carries much more meaning than simply “fit” or “appropriate.” This word also means “opposite or contrasting.” This implies that the two beings were designed to work and fit together perfectly, not just physically but in all ways. The strengths of each compensated for the weaknesses of the other. It was “not good” for the man to be alone (Genesis 2:18), but, together, Adam and Eve were something far stronger and more magnificent than either of them could have been alone. Adam had to lose a rib, but he gained so much more.

Why did God use Adam’s rib? A closer examination of the Hebrew also reveals another surprising element of the story. The Hebrew word translated “rib” in Genesis 2 is tsela. The only other instance of the English word rib in the Bible occurs in Daniel 7:5, but the Hebrew word used there is different. In other passages where tsela or its variants are used, the word is translated “side.” For example, in Exodus 25, 27, and 35, the words tselo (variant) and tselot (plural) are used to refer to the “sides” of the Ark of the Covenant or the “sides” of the altar. In 2 Samuel 16:13, David encounters a cursing Shimei moving along the side (tsela) of a hill. In these contexts, translating the word tsela as “rib” would not fit.

This raises the possibility that Eve could have been fashioned of more than just Adam’s rib. In the Genesis 2 passage, tsela could actually be translated as Adam’s “side,” rather than Adam’s “rib.” If the appropriate translation is that God removed Adam’s side, how much of his side did God remove? It is possible that Eve was constructed literally from half of Adam. This would bring added meaning to Adam’s declaration that Eve was “bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh” (Genesis 2:23).

Whether God created Eve from Adam’s rib or from his whole side, He accomplished the act in such a way that showed the woman was to complement and complete man in the integral union of marriage. Woman was created to be “beside” man, not beneath or above him. In salvation, man is no more “worthy” and woman is no less a citizen of God’s kingdom. “There is neither . . . male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). They stand side-by-side as fellow “heirs . . . of the gracious gift of life” (1 Peter 3:7).

Source: Elmer L. Towns, Bible Answers for Almost All Your Questions, THOMAS NELSON / 2003 / PAPERBACK

What is the Holy Bible?

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ORTHODOX HEART SITES

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What is the Holy Bible?

We believe the Holy Bible, comprised of the Old and New Testaments, to be the inspired, infallible, and authoritative Word of God (Matthew 5:18; 2 Timothy 3:16-17).

In faith we hold the Holy Bible to be inerrant in the original writings, God-breathed, and the complete and final authority for faith and practice (2 Timothy 3:16-17).

While still using the individual writing styles of the human authors, the Holy Spirit perfectly guided them to ensure they wrote precisely what He wanted written, without error or omission (2 Peter 1:21).